NBNA Letter Violence Against Asians

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NBNA Statement Against Violence in the Asian Community

 

NBNA Statement Against Violence in the Asian Community

March 19, 2021: Silver Spring, Maryland – March is National Women’s History Month, a time for celebration and yet we, as a nation, are faced with the senseless murder of eight people, including six Asian women that occurred on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 in the Atlanta-area. The National Black Nurses Association, Inc. (NBNA) acknowledges and mourns the loss of innocent lives in what appears to be a racially motivated hate crime and NBNA calls for an end of violence against women and all of humankind; especially violence targeted towards our Black and Brown sisters and brothers. 

We have seen a sharp rise in the number of hate crimes targeted towards the Asian, Asian American, and the Pacific Islander communities (AAPI) in the past year. These communities have been unfairly scapegoated and harassed by those seeking to place blame for the irresponsible handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in our country. Nearly 3,000 incidents have been reported to the Stop AAPI Hate group which has set up a reporting and tracking portal (https://stopaapihate.org/) where they are encouraging people to report any discriminatory incidents. We support these efforts to monitor and document the ongoing threats to these communities. We must not ignore or excuse for any reason the increasing number of assaults, threats, intimidation tactics, and deaths against the AAPI communities. Although some law enforcement has reportedly said they have the Asian American community in their hearts and prayers, I am sure these women’s families want to see these public servants helping them to find equity and justice in the court system. 

NBNA serves as the voice of over 300,000 historically underrepresented Black Nurses and we fully believe in the nursing code of ethics that calls us to practice with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and unique attributes of every person. Thus, NBNA stands in firm solidarity with the various AAPI communities in our condemnation of violence based in xenophobia, hate, misogyny, racism, and discrimination. We urge our nursing colleagues across the country to also denounce these acts as we all work towards a more tolerant and humane society.

 

NBNA Statement Against Violence in the Asian Community

March 19, 2021: Silver Spring, Maryland – March is National Women’s History Month, a time for celebration and yet we, as a nation, are faced with the senseless murder of eight people, including six Asian women that occurred on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 in the Atlanta-area. The National Black Nurses Association, Inc. (NBNA) acknowledges and mourns the loss of innocent lives in what appears to be a racially motivated hate crime and NBNA calls for an end of violence against women and all of humankind; especially violence targeted towards our Black and Brown sisters and brothers. 

We have seen a sharp rise in the number of hate crimes targeted towards the Asian, Asian American, and the Pacific Islander communities (AAPI) in the past year. These communities have been unfairly scapegoated and harassed by those seeking to place blame for the irresponsible handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in our country. Nearly 3,000 incidents have been reported to the Stop AAPI Hate group which has set up a reporting and tracking portal (https://stopaapihate.org/) where they are encouraging people to report any discriminatory incidents. We support these efforts to monitor and document the ongoing threats to these communities. We must not ignore or excuse for any reason the increasing number of assaults, threats, intimidation tactics, and deaths against the AAPI communities. Although some law enforcement has reportedly said they have the Asian American community in their hearts and prayers, I am sure these women’s families want to see these public servants helping them to find equity and justice in the court system. 

NBNA serves as the voice of over 300,000 historically underrepresented Black Nurses and we fully believe in the nursing code of ethics that calls us to practice with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and unique attributes of every person. Thus, NBNA stands in firm solidarity with the various AAPI communities in our condemnation of violence based in xenophobia, hate, misogyny, racism, and discrimination. We urge our nursing colleagues across the country to also denounce these acts as we all work towards a more tolerant and humane society.

March 19, 2021: Silver Spring, Maryland – March is National Women’s History Month, a time for celebration and yet we, as a nation, are faced with the senseless murder of eight people, including six Asian women that occurred on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 in the Atlanta-area. The National Black Nurses Association, Inc. (NBNA) acknowledges and mourns the loss of innocent lives in what appears to be a racially motivated hate crime and NBNA calls for an end of violence against women and all of humankind; especially violence targeted towards our Black and Brown sisters and brothers. 

We have seen a sharp rise in the number of hate crimes targeted towards the Asian, Asian American, and the Pacific Islander communities (AAPI) in the past year. These communities have been unfairly scapegoated and harassed by those seeking to place blame for the irresponsible handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in our country. Nearly 3,000 incidents have been reported to the Stop AAPI Hate group which has set up a reporting and tracking portal (https://stopaapihate.org/) where they are encouraging people to report any discriminatory incidents. We support these efforts to monitor and document the ongoing threats to these communities. We must not ignore or excuse for any reason the increasing number of assaults, threats, intimidation tactics, and deaths against the AAPI communities. Although some law enforcement has reportedly said they have the Asian American community in their hearts and prayers, I am sure these women’s families want to see these public servants helping them to find equity and justice in the court system. 

NBNA serves as the voice of over 300,000 historically underrepresented Black Nurses and we fully believe in the nursing code of ethics that calls us to practice with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and unique attributes of every person. Thus, NBNA stands in firm solidarity with the various AAPI communities in our condemnation of violence based in xenophobia, hate, misogyny, racism, and discrimination. We urge our nursing colleagues across the country to also denounce these acts as we all work towards a more tolerant and humane society.

NBNA-Letter-Violence-Against-Asians.pdf

 

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